Novel Biodegradable Scaffolds for Cell Growth and Regeneration

Technology #11116

Invention

The University of Florida is seeking a company interested in commercializing novel biomaterial scaffolds that are ideal for promoting the growth and regeneration of multiple cell types including stem cells. Current methods of cell growth and regeneration are expensive, and often produce unstable tissues with disorganized structures. Researchers at the University of Florida have developed new biomaterial scaffolds that provide an organized structure for containing, growing, and regenerating a variety of cell types.

Applications

Containing, growing, and regenerating cells in a variety of innovative applications, including:
  • Advanced tissue replacement engineering and regeneration strategies in humans or animals
  • Revolutionary approaches to food production
  • New controlled drug release devices

Advantages

Create stable, organized cells and tissues, offering a significant advantage over current regeneration technology
  • Inexpensive to produce, providing potential for high profit margin
  • Useful for a variety of industrial, medical, and veterinary applications, ensuring broad market potential and profitability
  • Important for innovative methods in medicine and food production, enabling further development of new consumer products
  • Based on well-established methods and materials, facilitating market acceptance

Technology

Researchers at the University of Florida have developed a new technology that uses stabilized copper-capillary alginate gels, polycaprolactone or gelatin, as tissue-engineering scaffolds that provide an organized structure for containing, growing, and regenerating a variety of cell types. The alginate gels are formed by allowing solutions of Cu2+ to diffuse into viscous solutions of alginate, and then stabilized with barium, chitosan, or a combination of the two. Gelatin and Matrigel® may also be used to coat polycaprolactone scaffolds for growing embryonic stem cells. The stabilized gels possess a regular capillary microstructure, providing effective scaffolds that architecturally and geometrically impose structural order on growing or regenerating cells and tissues. These new scaffolds will help build more structured replacement tissue, facilitate organized tissue regeneration, and create controlled in situ drug release devices. Moreover, they could become a fundamental component in the innovative production of synthetic meat products from animal cells.